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17-18 September, 2019|London, UK

Globally Renowned Speakers for America’s Biggest Brands


Joshua March

Joshua March

Co-founder and CEO, Conversocial

Seth Ellison

Seth Ellison

Executive Vice President and President, Europe, Levi Strauss and Company

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As Executive Vice President and President, Europe, Seth Ellison is responsible for the company’s overall business strategy and operations across all brands and channels in the region. In addition, he is a member of the company’s worldwide leadership team, which sets the company’s global direction.

Seth has a passion for growing global brands and a track record of success in large and small companies, in multiple geographies and apparel categories. He joined the company in September 2012 to serve as President of the Dockers® brand before relocating to Europe for his current role. He has more than 35 years of apparel experience – including Chief Commercial Officer at Alternative Apparel, President of the swimwear group at Perry Ellis, Vice President General Manager of Nike EMEA Apparel based in Hilversum, The Netherlands, President of Hurley International at Nike Inc., President of the outerwear division for Authentic Fitness and Vice President of design and merchandising at Quiksilver, Inc.

Ellison attended Stanford University in Palo Alto, California. His other passions include snowboarding, watersports, the martial arts and guitar.

Jo Causon

Jo Causon

Chief Executive, The Institute of Customer Service

Jo Moran

Jo Moran

Head of Customer Service, Marks & Spencer

Simon Separghan

Simon Separghan

Managing Director, Global Customer Operations & Digital Channels, Barclays

Carolijn Hauwert

Carolijn Hauwert

Social Media Hub & Social Customer Service, KLM

France Heringer-Jallot

France Heringer-Jallot

Senior Vice President, Customer Experience and Sales, Orange Group

Rob De Ridder

Rob De Ridder

EVP Customer Service Delivery, Danske Bank

Andrea Finnegan

Andrea Finnegan

Global Service Manager, Social Media CX, Airbnb

Mary McCarthy

Mary McCarthy

EMEA Customer Service Director, Microsoft

Joachim Franz

Joachim Franz

Head of Customer Experience Management, Volkswagen AG

Jos De Boes

Jos De Boes

Retired iToyota GM Customer Service Support, Toyota

Download the detailed event brochure

Full speaker list • Full conference agenda • Audience breakdown

Philip Purdy

Philip Purdy

Head, Customer and Client Services Europe, Travelzoo

Mairit Hollsten-Väinölä

Mairit Hollsten-Väinölä

VP Customer Support, Mobile Network, Nokia

Josef Bergman

Josef Bergman

Social & Digital Customer Care Lead EMEA, HP

Paolo Fabrizio

Paolo Fabrizio

Social & Digital Customer Service Trainer, Author, Speaker,

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Paolo Fabrizio is Social Customer Service expert. In the '90s takes part at the start-up of the first online insurance company in Italy, developing a a customer-first, international, mindset. In 2013 he launches SocialMediaScrum.com, leading blog / podcast about digital customer service. Consultant and trainer, he's author of 'La Rivoluzione del Social Customer Service', the 1st italian book about Social Customer Service. Keynote speaker at events in Italy and abroad

Sarah Metcalfe

Sarah Metcalfe

Head of Customer Service, Sure Petcare

Emma Raben

Emma Raben

Contact Centre Management and Social Media Customer Support, AIB

Sophie Elizabeth Clarke

Sophie Elizabeth Clarke

Social Media Manager, EMEA, Radisson Hotel Group

Janne Ohtonen PhD CCXP

Janne Ohtonen PhD CCXP

Customer Service Consultant,

Billie Lou Sastre Montiel

Billie Lou Sastre Montiel

Co Founder / Social Customer Care Evangelist, Sastre Martin

Guy Stephens

Guy Stephens

Co-founder, Snak Academy

Ian Golding

Ian Golding

Non-Executive Editor, Customer Experience Magazine

Charles Bennett

Charles Bennett

Chief Customer Officer, The Next Ten Years

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Full speaker list • Full conference agenda • Audience breakdown

Paolo Fabrizio

Paolo Fabrizio

Social Customer Service Trainer, Social Media Scrum

Troy Fisher

Troy Fisher

Digital Manager, Scottish & Southern Electricity Networks

Victoria Georgalakis

Victoria Georgalakis

Senior Vice President, EMEA Global, SYKES

Jesse Himsworth

Jesse Himsworth

Senior Vice President, Strategy and Integrated Solutions, Clearlink

Stuart Wheatcroft

Stuart Wheatcroft

Digital Services & Social Media Operations Manager, First Utility

Jonathon Taylor

Jonathon Taylor

Head of Service Strategy, EMEA, Twitter

Mike Copinger

Mike Copinger

Sales Director, UK & Ireland, Unbabel

Prelini Udayan-Chiechi

Prelini Udayan-Chiechi

VP Marketing, EMEA, Zendesk

Antonio Guzmán Sacristán

Antonio Guzmán Sacristán

Director of Innovation, Telefonica

Lauri Haav

Lauri Haav

Head of Customer Loyalty, Monese

Marta Ballarín Garnica

Marta Ballarín Garnica

Customer Service, TRAM

Dr. Gerhard Heide

Dr. Gerhard Heide

Director, Global Market Strategy, Pitney Bowes

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Full speaker list • Full conference agenda • Audience breakdown

Shreya Friend

Shreya Friend

Director, Customer Engagement Solutions, EMEA, Pitney Bowes

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Josef Bergman

Social & Digital Customer Care Lead EMEA,
HP

Take a look at our recent bitesize Q&A with HP

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  1. What are your top three customer service priorities for 2018?
    1. Data driven: Keeping Service Level and NPS scores
    2. Automation and extend self service options
    3. Expand to new channels 
  1. What is going to be the the biggest game changer for customer service professionals this year? E.g. new technologies, new channels, change in customer expectations.
    1. Various self service options via BOT’s
  1. What role do you think Chatbots will play in scaling customer support? Do you plan to use them as part of your CS operations within the next year?
    1. BOT’s will play a huge role in many areas, both for support, up-sales, self support etc. We already use a BOT and are looking to various fields to use them in.
  1. Do you see self-service playing a larger role in 2018? If so, what can companies do to help empower customers?
    1. Absolutely, this is the way ahead as everything is about speed and availability. BOT’s assisting in self-service or finding the right area for support is key in our complex and fast paced environment.
  1. How is social media customer service changing in 2018?
    1. Extending opening hours, opening up to new channels such as WhatsApp. Reviewing if RCS belongs to Social (Mobile)
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Jo Moran

Head of Customer Service,
Marks & Spencer

Take a look at our recent bitesize Q&A with Marks & Spencer

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  1. What are your top three customer service priorities for 2018?
    • To drive out inconsistent and indifferent service and ensure every customer gets a great M&S brand experience
    • To drive a seamless experience across our store, web and contact centres
    • To accelerate the role of technology in the customer experience
  1. What is going to be the biggest game changer for customer service professionals this year? E.g. new technologies, new channels, change in customer expectations.
    • Embracing new technology and playing it through the customer experience so that it’s seamless. Too often companies add another layer for customers rather than integrating it or removal old and outdated journeys .
  1. What role do you think Chatbots will play in scaling customer support? Do you plan to use them as part of your CS operations within the next year?
    • We already use Chatbots on a number of journeys for our customers with significant success. Our plans this year are to roll them further for both customers and colleagues.
  1. Do you see self-service playing a larger role in 2018? If so, what can companies do to help empower customers?
    • Self-service is one of key pillars for 2018, we can empower customers by simply getting it right first time so that they hopefully don’t need to self-serve but if they do then by making the journey as simple and streamlined as possible.
  1. How is social media customer service changing in 2018?
    • It will just continue to grow both as a communication and service channel – too many companies try to ignore it, it’s no good having a Twitter account for example if you aren’t going to answer customers comments. It’s not going away for plan for it and do it well.
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Jos De Boes

Retired iToyota GM Customer Service Support,
Toyota

Take a look at our recent bitesize Q&A with Toyota

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  1. What are your top three customer service priorities for 2018?
    • Priority is to replace customer satisfaction with recommendation. In this stage we need to track
      • Listen to the voice of the customer
      • Act on the voice of the customer
  1. What is going to be the biggest game changer for customer service professionals this year?
    • Most complex will be to integrate the new generations (Y&Z) thinking and priorities with the fast-changing technology of interaction and communication.
  1. What role do you think Chatbots will play in scaling customer support? Do you plan to use them as part of your CS operations within the next year?
    • Thanks to the fast development of deep learning, natural language processing, image recognition, big data analytics, intelligent voice interfaces, I believe Chatbots will start to play a major role in the first reaction/ fast service to customers today.
  1. Do you see self-service playing a larger role in 2018? If so, what can companies do to help empower customers?
    • Self service will be interesting for simple operations and requests. A proper Customer Service network (even driven by partly human partly AI interfaces will still have to be customized for each business)
  1. How is social media customer service changing in 2018?
    • Social media customer service leans also on the VOC reactions. Voice of the customer is more wide and not directly messaged to the companies but represents not only the recommenders but also the detractors which can cause damage to your image and provoke wider dissatisfaction.
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Jo Causon

Chief Executive,
The Institute of Customer Service

Take a look at our recent bitesize Q&A with The Institute of Customer Service

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  1. What are your top three customer service priorities for 2018?
  2. No company can be all things to all people, so it’s vital that organisations take the time to be really clear about who their core customer base is and how the organisation’s purpose relates to them. This is also important from an employee’s viewpoint as well. Where organisations try to do too much and lose focus, they run the risk of miscommunication and confusion.

    Additionally, a business needs to be able to measure the impact of what it is doing. Most organisations measure inputs and activity, but it’s showing the impact that really brings everything together. This is why measuring customer satisfaction is so important. It’s the external yardstick of how well a business is actually faring. Demonstrating high levels of satisfaction is very motivating to staff.

    I also see a growing need personalisation. Just as companies need to engage their staff, so it is essential that they engage their customers if they are to gain their loyalty and repeat business. The key to this is personalization is, giving customers a bespoke service experience that reflects their own preferences. Customers are yielding more data and information to companies – the quid pro quo for this is that they expect a more tailored service and that there information is used to in an authentic and transparent way.

  1. What is going to be the the biggest game changer for customer service professionals this year? E.g. new technologies, new channels, change in customer expectations.
  2. Customer motivations and priorities are dominated by the desire to work with organisations who are easy to do business with, whether that’s through technology (e.g. online or mobile apps) or through human interaction. They want to deal with staff who are knowledgeable, keep their promises and are willing to help. When a problem arises, they want to feel valued and that their issue is important to the organisation. This is likely to become even more important as 2018 progresses. If the past 12 months were tough for businesses, with a challenging economic climate – evidenced by the slowdown of growth in Q1 - and uncertainty abounding over Brexit and other political issues, 2018 will be the same and more.

    Meanwhile, the cost of living is likely to continue to rise, squeezing consumers more and driving even more pronounced customer polarisation. We could also see a continuation of the trend for government and regulatory intervention in industries where there are perceived market blockages or concerns. The ‘sharing economy’ will come under even greater scrutiny and its big players will face more pressure to demonstrate that they are looking after the workers in their care. The drive towards automation will continue – but this will have to be integrated into the customer experience not just a separate activity or purely a cost saving exercise!.

    Put all of these together and the search for the ultimate return on investment from service strategies will be the ultimate game changer for organisations.

  1. What role do you think Chatbots will play in scaling customer support? Do you plan to use them as part of your CS operations within the next year?
  2. Chatbots and artificial intelligence in general remains one of the most talked about customer experience areas. During the next year to three years I expect more organisations to expand their deployment of technology from robotics and automation to cognitive applications which are capable of improving processes and resource allocation, diagnosing and fixing problems, predicting customer needs and behaviours and identifying training needs and creating new services.

    Yet the challenges of implementing cognitive technologies to transform customer experience and business processes will be as much organisational and reputational as technological. Many of the most powerful applications will harness technology alongside people and the opportunity for artificial intelligence to create more joined up and seamless customer experiences will gather pace.

    Yet this will also mean that traditional customer experience attributes of trust and reputation will be needed more than ever to demonstrate to customers, and in some cases regulators, that artificial intelligence deployment is reliable, secure and delivers outcomes that benefit customers.

  1. Do you see self-service playing a larger role in 2018? If so, what can companies do to help empower customers?
  2. From the customer’s perspective it is less about self-service and more about securing a personalised experience. Depending on the activity many of us will be very happy to self serve, particularly where the activity is transactional and pretty simple or straightforward – functional. However where we require advice, knowledge and a more joined up experience that is often relationship based we will want a more personalized and genuine customer experience.

    In a climate of expanding choice, customers will also want integrated services across businesses and sectors. Above all perhaps, emotional and values driven factors will become more influential in shaping customers’ preferences and behaviour.

    Organisations will need to excel both in providing self-service facilities that don’t compromise the experience and deliver fast, efficient, convenient experiences and more empathetic and relationship based services. A key challenge will be the capacity to address both sets of needs and to move seamlessly between them.

  1. How is social media customer service changing in 2018?
  2. The rise of social media has fuelled and coincided with an increasing demand for speed, convenience and transparency which is challenging organisations’ customer service. Public visibility, immediacy and integration with other channels have forced organisations fundamentally to review their communications strategies.

    Our research highlights that a growing number of customers are using social media in a variety of ways to interact with organisations. This is why organisations are justified in approaching their social media strategy with some caution. Numerous high-profile cases have shown that the public nature of the channel can bring risks to corporate reputation, if not managed appropriately and consistently as part of a coherent customer service strategy.

    Social media has also created a need for a dynamic new mixture of skills in the workforce including heightened competences in emotional intelligence, commercial awareness, risk management, judgement and style of communication. But one of the most exciting aspects of social media is the opportunity it presents to listen and gain insight from customers and to demonstrate the learning and improvements that can be achieved as a result.

Speaker Photo

Carolijn Hauwert

Social Media Hub & Social Customer Service,
KLM

Take a look at our recent bitesize Q&A with KLM

Read more
  1. What are your top three customer service priorities for 2018?
    • Meeting the customers’ expectations while handling the growing volumes
    • Develop in chatbot / AI technology
    • Keep exploring additional platforms and services
  1. What is going to be the biggest game changer for customer service professionals this year? E.g. new technologies, new channels, change in customer expectations.
    • Develop chatbot / AI technology to keep meeting the increasing customers’ expectations while handling the growing volumes.
  1. What role do you think Chatbots will play in scaling customer support? Do you plan to use them as part of your CS operations within the next year?
    • When it comes to the proliferation of chatbot technology, key is to balance the human/AI interactions. We believe in a human approach supported by technology. We want to offer self-service functionalities to our customers via social media channels in a conversational way and we use i.e. bot technology to achieve this. When AI is not capable to help our customers, they will be automatically to one of our 300 human social service agents. These human agents are supported by AI.
  1. Do you see self-service playing a larger role in 2018? If so, what can companies do to help empower customers?
    • Yes, see answer to question 3. For KLM one of the main goals of chatbot / AI technology is to provide a seamless customer experience, partly through self-service chatbots and partly through by AI technology.
  1. How is social media customer service changing in 2018?
    • The challenges for 2018 described in the answer of question 1 are in line with the changes we expect in customer service.

Download the detailed event brochure

Complete speaker line-up • Program for all tracks & sessions • Audience breakdown